Last week, Ed Yong reported on a new paper examining transmission of Zaire virus from experimentally-infected pigs to co-housed macaques. Like the previous paper, they observed that Ebola in pigs was a respiratory disease, and that it could spread to other animals (in this case, non-human primates). The macaques they tested developed the symptoms of Ebola that were expected–a systemic disease, with virus isolated from the blood. In this study, they also added in an air sampling component, and were able to detect evidence of virus (via PCR) in the air. However, the authors do note that this could have been aerosolized in other manners than directly from the exhaling pigs (such as during the floor-cleaning process). Finally, even if it does become aerosolized and spread in this manner, as noted in Ed’s article, Ebola is not “suddenly an airborne virus, like influenza.” Certainly more efficient transmission takes place via close contact with infected secretions during hospital procedures and funeral rites.

Pig-to-monkey Ebola: is there something in the air? – Aetiology

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