Category Archives: Asia

Experts Concerned China May Soon Establish Southern ADIZ

U.S. and international security experts have expressed concerns that it may just be a matter of time before China establishes an air defense identification zone over disputed waters in the South China Sea.

China has been rapidly reclaiming land and making artificial islands in the South China Sea during the past year, causing strong reaction in the U.S. and many other countries.

Senator John McCain, Chairman of the U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee, said island building is just the beginning.

McCain said the next step for China will be to militarize those islands and declare an Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ) over the South China Sea to further its sovereignty claims.

Experts Concerned China May Soon Establish Southern ADIZ

Japan defence paper slams China’s ‘coercive’ maritime demands – Business Insider

Japan on Tuesday slammed Beijing’s bid to reclaim land in the South China Sea as a “coercive attempt” to force through sweeping maritime claims, in a defence paper that comes as Tokyo tries to expand the role of its military.

Tokyo said China was acting “unilaterally and without compromise”, as it also highlighted concern about North Korea’s nuclear programme and Russian moves in violence-wracked Ukraine.

The white paper accused Beijing of “raising concerns among the international community” in ramped-up criticism from last year’s report, an annual summary of Japan’s official view on defence matters.

“China, particularly over maritime issues, continues to act in an assertive manner, including coercive attempts at changing the status quo, and is poised to fulfil its unilateral demands without compromise,” said the report titled “Defense of Japan”.

Japan defence paper slams China’s ‘coercive’ maritime demands – Business Insider

Naval Buildups in the South China Sea | The Diplomat

After decades of operating legacy Soviet platforms, Vietnam’s navy is acquiring advanced new frigates from Russia and the Netherlands, capable new Russian diesel-electric submarines, and a host of modern anti-ship cruise missiles. The Philippines has nearly doubled its fleet of surface combat vessels in the last five years and is working to acquire two advanced new frigates. Malaysia was among the first in the region to add advanced submarines to their fleet and is indigenously building six new advanced French-designed frigates. Meanwhile, Indonesia is building two new Dutch-designed frigates and acquiring two improved South Korean submarines as part of an ambitious 20-year modernization and expansion program.

It is hardly a new observation that naval capabilities in Southeast Asia are surging. Harder to assess, though, is who has the advantage in a peer competition, or sufficient ability to prohibitively raise conflict costs to a more powerful aggressor. Focusing on what the region’s navies are acquiring is not that informative. It glazes over questioning the region’s strategic first principles – namely, assumptions about a country’s goals and what they think they need to achieve those goals – and whether (or to what degree) investments in naval capabilities are relevant to the ongoing disputes that appear to motivate them.

Naval Buildups in the South China Sea | The Diplomat

Philippines ramps up military spending in face of China threat | Reuters

The Philippines plans to ramp up military spending over the next 13 years, earmarking more than $20 billion to modernize its forces in the face of Beijing’s maritime ambitions in the disputed South China Sea, a top air force official told Reuters.

Major-General Raul del Rosario, military chief of plans, said the blueprint includes installing radars and sensors, and buying equipment such as submarines, frigates, fighters, surveillance planes and missile systems.

“By the time, we complete this plan, we will have complete coverage of the South China Sea,” said del Rosario, a former fighter pilot, showing the military’s detailed plan that was approved on Friday.

“We will have 24/7 awareness of what is happening in the disputed area and we’ll be able to respond quicker to any contingency in our own exclusive economic zone.”

Philippines ramps up military spending in face of China threat | Reuters

Japan doubles number of ships around disputed Diaoyu Islands after China sends vessels to the area | South China Morning Post

Japan is to double the size of its naval presence in waters around a set of disputed islands that are also claimed by China.

Less than a week after two ships from China’s coastguard entered a zone around the Diaoyu Islands that Japan claims as the Senkaku Islands, Tokyo announced that it would dispatch a further six of its own coastguard ships to the region.

Six Japanese patrol vessels are already tasked with protecting Japan’s claimed territory but there are growing concerns about increasing Chinese assertiveness.

When the Chinese crews of the Haijing 2307 and 2337 were challenged last week by a Japanese coastguard ship, they replied the islands were the “inherent territory of China” and that the surrounding waters were also Chinese.

Japan doubles number of ships around disputed Diaoyu Islands after China sends vessels to the area | South China Morning Post

In order to avoid another war in Asia, we need to visualize it.

“If the parallel for today is the period before World War I, as Henry Kissinger worries, …”

The risk is obvious: The once unthinkable is more thinkable by the day, a brewing Cold War between great powers, one that could even turn hot. The Pacific Ocean covers nearly a third of the Earth’s surface, making it a large canvas on which to paint a picture of the digital age’s first war between great powers. The potential locales could be the Taiwan Strait or an artificial islet in the South China Sea created by Chinese military construction teams. Or the spark for such a conflict may come halfway around the world, driven by China’s growing presence in strategically vital areas like the Middle East or Africa’s resource regions. If the parallel for today is the period before World War I, as Henry Kissinger worries, remember that there were numerous crises and standoffs between Great Britain, France, and Germany before 1914, with friction points from South Africa to Algeria to the Pacific. Yet it was an assassination in Sarajevo, at the other end of Europe from Berlin and London, which led both the world’s leaders and their publics to see logic in a war they once thought impossible in an age of globalization and progress.

Weapons of the Next War | The Diplomat

China’s rise in South China Sea unsettles region | UTSanDiego.com

The U.S. and China are jockeying for power in the South China Sea, deploying sharp words and an expanding fleet of warships, spy planes and fighter jets to protect their interests in a vital maritime domain.

Is this regional arms race and increasingly tense diplomatic showdown between the world’s two largest military forces a new Cold War?

Not exactly. But it is dangerous, according to military officials and analysts based in the Pacific Rim.

Run-ins between U.S. and Chinese military personnel in the South China Sea are happening on a routine basis, American commanders say, stressing their efforts to keep the encounters safe and professional. CNN broadcast one of them in late May, when the Chinese navy repeatedly warned a U.S. surveillance plane flying over man-made islands it occupies to clear out of the area.

China’s rise in South China Sea unsettles region | UTSanDiego.com

Report: ‘China’s Strategic Assertiveness’ Fueling Tensions in Asia | The Diplomat

The 2015 Yearbook emphasizes that regional tensions have been on the rise since 2008, a lot of which can be attributed to “China’s strategic assertiveness,” which manifests itself particularly in maritime territorial disputes.

Tensions in the South China Sea are ever on the rise, the publication explains, while bellicose actions and rhetoric over the Senkaku/Diaoyu Islands in the East China Sea ebbed somewhat in 2014 — SIPRI singles out the reduction of Chinese Coast Guard patrols around the islands as a sign of relaxation.

Additionally, the publication says that “regional military expenditure trends show that states engaged in territorial disputes with China have launched military modernization programs.” SIPRI also notes that nations concerned over “China’s continued modernization efforts” have sought closer ties with the United States.

China appears to be slowly eroding the United States’ position as a principal arbiter regional disputes:  “Within the area of regional security, China is increasingly using its own forums to advance structures that diminish the capacity of the USA to help manage and resolve conflicts in the region.”

Report: ‘China’s Strategic Assertiveness’ Fueling Tensions in Asia | The Diplomat

China and US on collision course for war over South China Sea | News.Com.Au

“This will happen. This is about power.

“The American pentagon is on a collision course with China.

“So the South China Sea has become a flashpoint for war.”

The deputy dean of global studies at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Professor Joseph Siracussa, told news.com.au that the two nations were “spoiling for a fight”.

Despite the economic ties between China and the global economy, he said it wouldn’t stop a war.

“Economics mean very little at the end of the day,” said Prof Siracussa, who is an expert in human security and international diplomacy.

“Once you militarise a problem, you don’t get a diplomatic solution.

“The [US] Secretary of Defence’s job is to think about the next war and how to beat them up.

“The trigger is there, it’s just waiting to happen,” he said.

During a “Re-assessing the Global Nuclear Order” conference in January, Prof Siracussa said discussions about “inevitable” war between the US and China were quite open and on the table.

“They were discussing the inevitable war with China,” he said.

“This will happen. This is about power.

“The American pentagon is on a collision course with China.

“So the South China Sea has become a flashpoint for war.”

China and US on collision course for war over South China Sea

I agree with this assessment: “The South China Sea has become a flashpoint for war.” It’s only a matter of time before something happens.

China plans to build coast guard base near Senkaku Islands: sources | The Japan Times

The China Coast Guard, which has been sending vessels into waters around the Senkaku Islands more frequently since 2012, plans to build a large base in Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province, to enhance monitoring of the chain, sources close to the matter said Saturday.

By building the base in Wenzhou, which is close to the Japan-administered islets, the coast guard is apparently hoping to bolster support for surveillance vessels so China can strengthen its claim to them.

China calls the uninhabited islets Diaoyu, but they are also claimed by nearby Taiwan, which calls them Tiaoyutai.

The move came after revelations that China’s military is building large base facilities on the Nanji Islands, which are in the same province and even closer to the Senkakus, indicating that Beijing is poised to test Japan through concerted efforts by the military and coast guard.

China plans to build coast guard base near Senkaku Islands: sources | The Japan Times

You may not want nuclear war but nuclear war wants you. To me this sounds like only nuclear war is going to stop China. Not that we want that but China doesn’t seem to care. Realistically, the US is not going to start a nuclear war with China. Instead, China will be starting a nuclear war with the US. Hey, it’s perfectly clear that China really doesn’t care about nuclear war. It does whatever it wants. Unless something significantly changes on the China side real soon, we are headed for nuclear war.

In my opinion, if there hasn’t been a nuclear war by the end of Obama’s term in office then the US should count itself lucky.