Category Archives: general

Yuri Bezmenov: Deception Was My Job

This is G. Edward Griffin’s shocking video interview, Soviet Subversion of the Free-World Press (1984), where he interviews ex-KGB officer and Soviet defector Yuri Bezmenov who decided to openly reveal KGB’s subversive tactics against western society as a whole.

Bezmenov explains how Marxist ideology is destabilizing the economy and purposefully pushing the U.S. into numerous crises so that a “Big Brother” tyranny can be put into place in Washington, how most Americans don’t even realize that they are under attack, and that normal parliamentary procedures will not alter the federal government’s direction.

He then explains how Marxist leaders use informers to make lists of anti-Communist and other politically incorrect people who they want to execute once they come to power. The oligarch’s secret lists include “civil rights” activists and idealistically-minded “useful idiot” leftists as well.

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Bezmenov provides several real world examples of how Marxist leaders even execute and/or imprison each other. Also he explains how American embassy employees were known to betray Soviets attempting to defect, how there existed a “triangle of hate” in the Soviet government, why he realized that Marxism-Leninism was a murderous doctrine, and how the CIA ignored (or didn’t care) about Communist subversion.

He also mentions that revolutions throughout history are never the result of a majority movement, but of a small dedicated and highly-organized group who seize power, whether for good or bad. Next he explains how the American mass media spread lies about life in the Soviet Union.

Bezmenov also explains how the LOOK magazine article falsely claimed that the Russian people were proud of their victory in the Second World War, where in reality the Bolshevik-Communist-Marxist government was happy that Hitler had been defeated so that they could remain in power.

Find out how the KGB utilized various individuals to undermine the Western society in its morals and values.

Yuri Bezmenov: Deception Was My Job – YouTube

‘Feminised’ physics a formula for failure, says Michelle Simmons

“One of the few things that horrified me when I arrived in Australia (in 1999) was to discover that, several years ago the high school physics curriculum was “feminised”, Professor Simmons told a high-profile audience at Sydney’s Conservatorium of Music.

“In other words, to make it more appealing to girls, our curriculum’s designers substituted formulae with essays! What a ­disaster,’’ she said.

Professor Simmons obtained a physics PhD in her native Britain but chose to work in Australia in 1999 because it offered “a culture of academic freedom, openness to ideas, and an amazing willingness to pursue goals that are ambitious”. She gained Australian citizenship in 2007 and now heads a team considered the world leader in the “space race of the computing era” — the quest to develop a quantum computer.

‘Feminised’ physics a formula for failure, says Michelle Simmons

How statistics lost their power – and why we should fear what comes next | William Davies | Politics | The Guardian

“The declining authority of statistics – and the experts who analyse them – is at the heart of the crisis that has become known as “post-truth” politics”

The declining authority of statistics – and the experts who analyse them – is at the heart of the crisis that has become known as “post-truth” politics. And in this uncertain new world, attitudes towards quantitative expertise have become increasingly divided. From one perspective, grounding politics in statistics is elitist, undemocratic and oblivious to people’s emotional investments in their community and nation. It is just one more way that privileged people in London, Washington DC or Brussels seek to impose their worldview on everybody else. From the opposite perspective, statistics are quite the opposite of elitist. They enable journalists, citizens and politicians to discuss society as a whole, not on the basis of anecdote, sentiment or prejudice, but in ways that can be validated. The alternative to quantitative expertise is less likely to be democracy than an unleashing of tabloid editors and demagogues to provide their own “truth” of what is going on across society.

How statistics lost their power – and why we should fear what comes next | William Davies | Politics | The Guardian

Data manipulation is a big problem, and inappropriate use of the “normal” distribution by claiming data independence when that in fact is not true. Another problem is surveys with flawed questions. Then experts repeatedly hide behind these statistics in order to game the system. Now, not surprisingly, people are fed up.

This all leads us right back to the universities. The so-called experts from universities are a big problem. It’s time to drain the university swamp system of government money.

Science falling victim to ‘crisis of narcissism’ | Science | The Guardian

“Many great scientists are narcissists. It’s a bit sad, but it’s a fact,” he said. “This might surprise an external observer, because scientists are usually perceived as being modest searchers for the truth and working collectively for the advancement of science.”

Lemaitre is not suggesting his profession is unique in having experienced a rise in individualism – politics, film or fashion are probably worse and the trend is global, he says, but it has some worrying implications that are specific to science.

“The influence of narcissism on so many aspects of science calls into question [its] very objectivity,” he said.

Science falling victim to ‘crisis of narcissism’ | Science | The Guardian

Defense secretary nominee Mattis warns world order under historic threat | Fox News

Defense secretary nominee Gen. James Mattis issued a grave warning Thursday at his Senate confirmation hearing, saying the established world order is under its “biggest attack” since World War II as he called for boosting military readiness and America’s alliances.

Under questioning from Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman John McCain, R-Ariz., about Russia and other threats, Mattis said the U.S. should “recognize the reality” of dealing with Vladimir Putin’s government and that he’s trying to “break” the North Atlantic alliance.

Defense secretary nominee Mattis warns world order under historic threat | Fox News

America’s future looks bleak to academic, intelligence analysts – Washington Times

“The next five years will see rising tensions within and between countries,” the 235-page report concludes. “Global growth will slow just as increasingly complex global challenges impend. An ever-widening range of states, organizations and empowered individuals will shape geopolitics.”

Worse, the analysts predict the post-Cold War era of American world dominance is drawing to a close, along with the rules-based international order in place since the end of World War II.

International cooperation will be much harder, and “veto players will threaten to block collaboration at every turn, while information ‘echo chambers’ will reinforce countless competing realities, undermining shared understandings of world events.”

America’s future looks bleak to academic, intelligence analysts – Washington Times

These Four Growing Risks Threaten Global Stability | | Observer

… Look for inherent instability in the very structure of the international system, its post-Cold War agreements and US-led institutions as we figure out who will lead the way. …

In 2016, we witnessed an unprecedented crisis of political legitimacy in both democratic and nondemocratic countries (in fact, it’s been building for awhile, as I’ve noted before). …

The anti-globalization backlash we are seeing today looks eerily similar to the years leading up to World War I– often termed the first era of globalization, which also led to populism, major conflicts and a depression. …

Yes, sigh – it’s looking fairly bleak for 2017. We are likely headed towards a multi-layered global crisis that will certainly bleed into individual countries and regions. Perhaps we shouldn’t hold our breath for some political visionary to suddenly appear and guide us through. But the silver lining might be that we as global citizens are in an empowered position to be relatively more engaged–to create new ideas and new values to shape a new future, while policy-makers muddle through.

These Four Growing Risks Threaten Global Stability | | Observer

The Global Risks Report 2017 | Articles | Zurich Insurance

This 12th edition of The Global Risks Report is published at a time of heightened political uncertainty, following a year of unexpected electoral results, particularly in the United States and the United Kingdom. Polarized societies and political landscapes are taking centre stage in many countries, with deepening generational and cultural divisions amplifying the risks associated with sluggish economic recovery and accelerating technological change.

These tensions have been building for some time, and over the past 10 years a nexus of social, political and economic fragilities has been a consistent focus of The Global Risks Report. The events of 2016 should serve as a wake-up call and prompt us to reassess our preparedness in the face of an evolving risk landscape.

While we should be wary of attributing too much influence to a series of very recent electoral results, the consequences of which are still unknown, major unexpected events can serve as inflection points. Long-term trends – such as persistent inequality and deepening polarization, which ranked first and third in perceived importance in the Global Risks Perception Survey (GRPS) this year – can build to a point at which they become triggers for change. This kind of change might involve risks intensifying or crystallizing, but it is important to recognize that shocks and releases of tension might also lead to a brightening of the risk outlook. We are in a period of flux; paradoxically this is therefore a time when things could improve.

The world is undergoing multiple complex transitions: towards a lower-carbon future; towards technological change of unprecedented depth and speed; towards new global economic and geopolitical balances. Managing these transitions and the deeply interconnected risks they entail will require long-term thinking, investment and international cooperation. It will also require policy-makers to bring voters with them – one of the lessons of 2016 is that we are very far from consensus on how to proceed.

This year’s Global Risks Report takes as its starting point the societal and political polarization that besets an increasing number of countries and that looks set to be a determining feature of the political landscape not just for the next few years but for the next few electoral cycles. In Part 1, the Report draws on the trends and risks highlighted in the latest GRPS to outline the key challenges that the world now faces: reviving economic growth; reforming market capitalism; facing up to the importance of identity and community; managing technological change; protecting and strengthening our systems of global cooperation; and deepening our efforts to protect the environment.

Part 2 explores three social and political risks in greater depth. The first chapter considers whether recent political trends amount to a crisis of Western democracy. It looks at underlying patterns that have led to a weakening of democratic legitimacy and points to three strategies that might help to restore it. The second piece highlights the importance of civil society in mitigating risks and assesses trends towards the curtailment of civil society organizations’ freedom to operate. The final chapter in this part of the Report looks at one of the gravest long-term challenges facing the world: how to build systems of social protection that can cope with the seismic demographic, economic and other changes that have transfigured social structures and individual lives over the last three decades.

Part 3 turns towards technology, which is at once a source of disruption and polarization and an inevitable part of whatever responses to these trends we choose to pursue. Informed by the results of a special GRPS module on emerging technologies, the urgency of the governance challenge in this area is stressed. This is followed by two in-depth assessments of specific technological risks: first, in relation to artificial intelligence, and second, in relation to our rapidly changing physical infrastructure needs and vulnerabilities.

The Global Risks Report 2017 | Articles | Zurich Insurance

What the World Might Look Like in 5 Years, According to U.S. Intelligence – The Atlantic

Every four years, a group of U.S. intelligence analysts tries to predict the future. And this year, in a report released just weeks before Donald Trump assumes the presidency, those analysts forecast a massive shift in international affairs over the next five years or so: “For better and worse, the emerging global landscape is drawing to a close an era of American dominance following the Cold War,” the study argues. “So, too, perhaps is the rules-based international order that emerged after World War II.”

The National Intelligence Council (NIC), a unit within the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, is essentially marking the potential end not just of America’s status as the world’s sole superpower, but also of the current foundation for much of that power: an open international economy, U.S. military alliances in Asia and Europe, and liberal rules and institutions—rules like human-rights protections and institutions like the World Trade Organization—that shape how countries behave and resolve their conflicts.

What the World Might Look Like in 5 Years, According to U.S. Intelligence – The Atlantic

The Stories You Missed in 2016 | Foreign Policy

From China’s bubble to Russia’s undersea drones, here are big stories around the world that flew under the radar this year.

The past year had no shortage of monster storylines. The surprise eruption of Donald Trump from primary sideshow to GOP nominee to president-elect probably tops the list. But close behind are Britain’s sudden departure from Europe, the rise of populism across the board, and especially a resurgent Russia’s effort to sow dissension in the West to grease its return to global prominence. Those massive headlines overshadowed many others that were huge and important. Here’s a few you may have missed.

The Stories You Missed in 2016 | Foreign Policy