Category Archives: Nuclear

Air Force admits nuclear flaws, faces uncertain path to remedying underinvestment, low morale | Fox News

Faced with one of its biggest challenges in years — repairing a troubled nuclear missile corps — the Air Force has taken an important first step by admitting, after years of denial, that its problems run deep and wide.

Less certain is whether it will find all the right fixes, apply them fully and convince a doubting force of launch officers, security guards and other nuclear workers that their small and narrow career field is not a dead end.

The stakes are huge.

The nation’s strategy for deterring nuclear war rests in part on the 450 Minuteman 3 missiles that stand ready, 24/7, to launch at a moment’s notice from underground silos in five states.

Air Force admits nuclear flaws, faces uncertain path to remedying underinvestment, low morale | Fox News

The Most Dangerous Nuclear Threat No One Is Talking About | The National Interest Blog

While Iran and North Korea’s nuclear programs are all the rage these days, the most dangerous nuclear threat facing the world continues to go largely unnoticed.

Namely, China and India are both on the cusp of deploying multiple independently targetable reentry (MIRV) vehicles on their ballistic missiles, a development that is likely to have profound, far-reaching consequences for the region and beyond.

In other words, MIRVs are extremely destabilizing because they make adversary’s nuclear arsenals vulnerable to being wiped out in a surprise first strike. To compensate for this fact, states must come up with innovative ways to secure their deterrent from an enemy first strike. This usually entails increasing the size of one’s arsenal, and further dispersing to make it more difficult for an enemy to conduct a successful first strike. For example, when the U.S. first deployed MIRVed missiles in 1968, the Soviet Union had less than 10,000 nuclear warheads. A decade later, however, it had over 25,000 (of course, the Soviet Union deploying its own MIRVed missiles incentivized expanding the size of its arsenal since more warheads were needed per missile).

The Most Dangerous Nuclear Threat No One Is Talking About | The National Interest Blog

Welcome to China and America’s Nuclear Nightmare | The National Interest

FOR ALL the focus on maritime disputes in the South and East China Seas, there is an even greater peril in Asia that deserves attention. It is the rising salience of nuclear weapons in the region. China’s military buildup—in particular its growing capabilities to blunt America’s ability to project effective force in the western Pacific—is threatening to change the military balance in the area. This will lead to a cascade of strategic shifts that will make nuclear weapons more central in both American and Chinese national-security plans, while increasing the danger that other regional states will seek nuclear arsenals of their own. Like it or not, nuclear weapons in Asia are back.

For seventy years, the United States has militarily dominated maritime Asia. During this era, U.S. forces could, generally speaking, defeat any challenger in the waters of the western Pacific or in the skies over them. Washington established this preeminence and has retained it in the service of a strategy motivated both by parochial interests such as protecting American territory and commerce as well as by more high-minded aspirations to foster the growth and development of prosperous, liberal societies within the region. Military primacy has been the crucial underwriter, the predicate of broader American strategy.

Welcome to China and America’s Nuclear Nightmare | The National Interest

China Tests ICBM With Multiple Warheads | Washington Free Beacon

China carried out a long-range missile flight test on Saturday using multiple, independently targetable reentry vehicles, or MIRVs, according to U.S. defense officials.

The flight test Saturday of a new DF-41 missile, China’s longest-range intercontinental ballistic missile, marks the first test of multiple warhead capabilities for China, officials told the Washington Free Beacon.

China has been known to be developing multiple-warhead technology, which it obtained from the United States illegally in the 1990s.

However, the Dec. 13 DF-41 flight test, using an unknown number of inert maneuvering warheads, is being viewed by U.S. intelligence agencies as a significant advance for China’s strategic nuclear forces and part of a build-up that is likely to affect the strategic balance of forces.

China’s nuclear arsenal is estimated to include around 240 very large warheads. That number is expected to increase sharply as the Chinese deploy new multiple-warhead missiles.

China Tests ICBM With Multiple Warheads | Washington Free Beacon

Pentagon Considering Deployment of Nuclear Missiles in Europe | Washington Free Beacon

The Pentagon is considering the re-deployment of nuclear cruise missiles in Europe in response to a new Russian cruise missile that the United States has charged violates a 1987 nuclear treaty, a senior Pentagon official told Congress on Wednesday.

Brian P. McKeon, deputy undersecretary of defense for policy, said U.S. cruise missile deployments are among a range of options being considered if Russian fails to return to compliance with the Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces (INF) treaty.

McKeon did not provide details of the military options being studied but said they ranged from “reactive defense, to counterforce, to counter value defense measures.”

Pentagon Considering Deployment of Nuclear Missiles in Europe | Washington Free Beacon

Here is my comment for the Pentagon: Do it yesterday!

Iran: White House Lying About Iran’s Concessions in Nuke Talks | Washington Free Beacon

The Obama administration is misleading lawmakers and the public about purported concessions made by Iran in the latest round of nuclear talks, top Iranian officials insisted over the weekend, renewing a year-old debate about the administration’s transparency regarding the fragile negotiations.

Iran over the weekend pushed back against key claims made by the administration to lawmakers and the press about further concessions agreed to by Iran following the last round of talk in Vienna regarding the country’s contested nuclear program.

Iran: White House Lying About Iran’s Concessions in Nuke Talks | Washington Free Beacon

Dianne Feinstein: America’s nuclear arsenal is unnecessarily and unsustainably large – The Washington Post

Today, however, nuclear weapons are seen as a financial burden and a threat to global security. Furthermore, our nuclear stockpile is competing for limited defense spending, money that could be used to address more pressing challenges such as the fight against the Islamic State and defending against cyberattacks.

That’s why the amount the United States spends to maintain and modernize its nuclear arsenal is so staggering. Over the next decade, the Congressional Budget Office reports that the United States will spend $355 billion on nuclear weapons.

We’re holding far more nuclear weapons than are necessary, and the cost is undermining other national security priorities. It’s time we take a long look at how we can responsibly reduce our stockpile.

Dianne Feinstein: America’s nuclear arsenal is unnecessarily and unsustainably large – The Washington Post

We’re on the verge of war and idiots like Dianne Feinstein are still trying to reduce America’s nuclear arsenal. They are just going to bring their own demise a little faster.

Time for Japan to Get Its Own Nuclear Weapons? | The National Interest

America’s policy of opposing the proliferation of nuclear weapons needs to be more nuanced. What works for the United States in the Middle East may not in Asia. We do not want Iran or Saudi Arabia to get the bomb, but why not Australia, Japan, and South Korea? We are opposed to nuclear weapons because they are the great military equalizer, because some countries may let them slip into the hands of terrorists, and because we have significant advantage in precision conventional weapons. But our opposition to nuclear weapons in Asia means we are committed to a costly and risky conventional arms race with China over our ability to protect allies and partners lying nearer to China than to us and spread over a vast maritime theater.

None of our allies in Asia possess nuclear weapons. Instead, they are protected by what is called extended deterrence, our vaguely stated promise to use nuclear weapons in their defense if they are threatened by regional nuclear powers, China, North Korea and Russia. We promise, in essence, to trade Los Angeles for Tokyo, Washington for Canberra, and Seattle for Seoul, as preposterous as that might seem.

Time for Japan to Get Its Own Nuclear Weapons? | The National Interest

This was China´s decision to make, and it made it. China decided that Japan should have nuclear weapons. China´s aggressive behavior coupled with its military build-up means that Japan should have nuclear weapons.

Inside Moscow’s Site 1 nuclear bunker designed to hold 2,700 people | Daily Mail Online

Have you ever wondered where Russians would go if we dropped nuclear bombs on them?

Thanks to eye-opening pictures provided by Moscow construction worker Mikhail Bratza, we in the West can now see the grim 650-feet underground welcome that 2,700 Russian citizens would receive if nuclear war became reality.

The only problem is that the bunker’s power and water supplies would fail after just two days, leaving refugees with no choice but to venture into the nuclear wasteland their city would have become.

Inside Moscow’s Site 1 nuclear bunker designed to hold 2,700 people | Daily Mail Online

Russia Looks to Revive Nuclear Missile Trains to Counter U.S. Attack Capability | The Moscow Times

Russia’s Strategic Rocket Forces are considering bringing back iconic Soviet-era nuclear missile trains as Moscow pumps money into a complete overhaul its aging nuclear arsenal.

According to an unidentified source in the Russian military-industrial complex quoted by the TASS news agency on Thursday, the Moscow Institute of Thermal Technology — makers of the Topol, Yars and Bulava missiles — is designing a next-generation missile launching train.

“While the decision to start manufacturing [missile trains] is still pending, the probability is high that it will happen,” the source was quoted as saying, explaining that technical studies and cost estimates are still being conducted.

“In the best-case scenario, they will be deployed by the end of the decade, probably somewhere around 2019,” he said.

Russia Looks to Revive Nuclear Missile Trains to Counter U.S. Attack Capability | The Moscow Times