Category Archives: Nuclear

How Modernizing The U.S. Army Can Make Nuclear War Less Likely

The Russians know this, and have their own strategy for going nuclear in a future regional conflict. The Russian military’s chief of staff said in 2011 that local conflicts anywhere along his country’s borders could result in use of nuclear weapons, and doctrine has been developed for how Moscow would use nuclear weapons to gain the upper hand in a fight. Problem is, once the weapons of mass destruction start flying, the fight could escalate to an all-out strategic exchange.

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If it did, American democracy might not survive. Tens of millions of Americans could die during the first weeks of war. There is little indication President Obama gave any thought to this possibility before extending his ill-advised commitments to countries lying only a few minutes from Russian military bases.

How Modernizing The U.S. Army Can Make Nuclear War Less Likely

US Intel Images Suggest Another N. Korean Missile Launch Site

The silo, an underground chamber used for storing and firing missiles, seems analogous to the one at a missile base in Tabriz, Iran, with the same 7.4-meter-wide sliding cover and the same type of exhaust vents, the intelligence consultancy told VOA on Tuesday.

That U.S.-based group added that this rectangular-shaped structure appears large enough to house current North Korean missiles capable of carrying nuclear warheads that can strike neighboring countries, such as South Korea and Japan.

“If this Iranian site is housing missiles and the North Korean site that we have uncovered is the exact same dimension, then it’s quite possible that the site that we have uncovered is housing missiles as well,” said Ryan Barenklau, founder of Strategic Sentinel.

He also suggested a possible nuclear cooperation between the two countries.

US Intel Images Suggest Another N. Korean Missile Launch Site

North Korea ‘racing ahead’ on nuclear plan, defector says – CNNPolitics.com

Political uncertainty in the United States and in South Korea could give North Korean leader Kim Jong-un “an apt time” to develop nuclear weapons “at all costs by the end of 2017,” a high-profile North Korean diplomat who recently defected to South Korea said Tuesday.

“Due to domestic political procedures, North Korea calculates that South Korea and the US will not be able to take physical or military actions to deter North Korea’s nuclear development,” Thae Yong-ho, formerly No. 2 at the North Korean Embassy in London, said in a news briefing, according to the Yonhap News Agency.

North Korea ‘racing ahead’ on nuclear plan, defector says – CNNPolitics.com

Trump Said the U.S. Should Expand Nuclear Weapons. He’s Right. – POLITICO Magazine

The potential threats are everywhere. Washington faces an increasing risk of conflict with a newly assertive, nuclear-armed China in the South China Sea. Beijing is expanding its nuclear forces and it is estimated that the number of Chinese warheads capable of reaching the U.S. homeland has more than trebled in the past decade and continues to grow. And Russia has become more aggressive in Europe and the Middle East and has engaged in explicit nuclear saber rattling the likes of which we have not seen since the 1980s. At the height of the crisis over Crimea in 2014, for example, Russian President Vladimir Putin ominously declared, “It’s best not to mess with us … I want to remind you that Russia is one of the leading nuclear powers.” And on Tuesday, he vowed to “enhance the combat capability of strategic nuclear forces, primarily by strengthening missile complexes that will be guaranteed to penetrate existing and future missile defense systems.” As former Defense Secretary William Perry correctly notes, “Today, the danger of some sort of a nuclear catastrophe is greater than it was during the Cold War.”

Trump Said the U.S. Should Expand Nuclear Weapons. He’s Right. – POLITICO Magazine

Roger This: Time To Give Deterrence A Rethink | Los Alamos Daily Post

‘The theory of deterrence is still doing its voodoo to some extent. It weathered plenty of knocks and has been given a lot of credit, but it never achieved much more than a shared illusion, which a number of scholars have seriously compared to a kind of taboo.’

A central problem that is rapidly coming to a head is that the theory of nuclear deterrence, while still a critical factor for global security in general, is unraveling.

“I’m sorry to report to you that the likelihood of a nuclear crisis today is greater than it was at any time since the Cuban Missile Crisis,” former Defense Secretary William Perry remarked at a nuclear disarmament conference in Santa Fe this month. Perry said he was driven by “a fundamental belief” that “nuclear weapons should never be used again.” He added, “My problem is I don’t know how to make that belief happen.”

Slowly despite perilous moments and continuing risks of accidents and unintentional confrontation, the deterrence theory evolved into to a kind of a shaky security framework that is credited with reducing major power conflict but has been unable to chalk up more than a few grudging arms reductions and highly touted but inadequate steps toward disarmament.
The theory of deterrence is still doing its voodoo to some extent. It weathered plenty of knocks and has been given a lot of credit, but it never achieved much more than a shared illusion, which a number of scholars have seriously compared to a kind of taboo. Unfortunately, that level of charm won’t hold a candle to the human-genome-crushing power of the atom.

Roger This: Time To Give Deterrence A Rethink | Los Alamos Daily Post

Iran Vows Nuclear Retaliation for U.S. Breach of Deal

Senior Iranian officials vowed on Wednesday to continue moving forward with nuclear weapons work and other banned activities as retaliation against the United States for breaching last year’s nuclear accord, according to reports in the country’s state-controlled media.

Iranian leaders instructed the country’s atomic energy organization to move forward with sensitive nuclear work, including the construction of nuclear-powered ships and submarines.

Further provocative actions will be announced in the coming days, according to these Iranian leaders, who described the country’s actions as revenge for recent moves by the U.S. Congress to extend sanctions on Iran, a move the Islamic Republic claims is a breach of the nuclear deal.

Iran Vows Nuclear Retaliation for U.S. Breach of Deal

North Korea still struggling with nuclear missile re-entry: U.S. official | Reuters

North Korea appears able to mount a miniaturized nuclear warhead on a missile but is still struggling with missile re-entry technology necessary for longer range strikes, a senior U.S. military official said on Thursday.

“I think they could mate a warhead with a delivery device. They’re just not sure (about) re-entry,” said the official, speaking to reporters on condition of anonymity.

“They’re endeavoring to overcome that.”

North Korea still struggling with nuclear missile re-entry: U.S. official | Reuters

Russia is number one threat to United States and Nato | World | News | Daily Express

RUSSIA is now the “number one threat” to the United States because of its nuclear capability, top US military officials have warned.

The officials’ comments came amid concerns over Donald Trump’s promise to build closer ties with Vladimir Putin.

Air Force Secretary Deborah James, said: “Russia is the number one threat to the United States.

“We have a number of threats that we’re dealing with, but Russia could be, because of the nuclear aspect, an existential threat to the United States.”

Russia is number one threat to United States and Nato | World | News | Daily Express

They’re a little late with this. Where were they 10 years ago?

James Mattis warned that land-based nuclear missiles pose false alarm danger | US news | The Guardian

James Mattis, the retired general Donald Trump has chosen to be the next US defence secretary, has questioned the need for land-based nuclear missiles on the grounds they represent a higher risk than other weapons of being launched on a false alarm.

Mattis raised doubts about US nuclear orthodoxy in a statement to Congress in 2015, raising the issue over whether nuclear deterrence should continue to rest on a “triad” of weapon types: land-based intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs), submarine-launched missiles and warheads carried by air force bombers. During the campaign, Trump vowed to proceed with current plans to modernise all three legs of the triad, with an estimated price tag of half a trillion dollars over 20 years.

James Mattis warned that land-based nuclear missiles pose false alarm danger | US news | The Guardian

Inside the Ring: Russia holds large-scale nuclear war games – Washington Times

One official said the exercises, involving numerous launches of nuclear missiles, were gauged to be at levels that reached or exceeded the kind of Soviet strategic force exercises held during the Cold War.

“This resembled the days of the Soviet Union in both numbers and breadth of exercises,” said one official familiar with reports of the maneuvers.

The Russians also recently conducted a large-scale civil defense evacuation exercise involving some 40 million people.

“This is unprecedented since the end of the Soviet Union,” Mr. Schneider said. “After the election, I expect to see strong nuclear threats from Moscow aimed at getting its way on missile defense, sanctions and Russian domination of Eastern Europe.”

Inside the Ring: Russia holds large-scale nuclear war games – Washington Times

We are clearly in a new ballgame. Russia is serious about being prepared for nuclear war. Meanwhile, the US sleeps. But Russia claims it is only preparing because it expects a nuclear attack from the US. The same US who is utterly unprepared for any kind of major war.