Category Archives: U.S.

Are rightwing pundits right that America is on the brink of a civil war? | US news | The Guardian

A sense has been developing on the right that the old political adversaries are deadly enemies and that the US is headed for a profound, perhaps bloody crisis

Lately on the right, a sense has been developing that the American project is heading for a profound, perhaps bloody crisis. More and more, we hear talk of “civil war” – some say we have already embarked on a “cold” one.

The shooting of representative Steve Scalise pulled these ideas into sharper focus, but “civil war” talk had already been subsisting on fears of violence from anti-fascist (“antifa”) groups. Several violent confrontations have occurred throughout the country this year as right wing activists, claiming to speak for “free speech”, have gathered to square off with their masked enemies.

Are rightwing pundits right that America is on the brink of a civil war? | US news | The Guardian

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In my opinion the US is headed for some kind of civil war. This is consistent with the signs from 9/11 and the 2008 financial crisis. 60 to 80 after the last big crisis comes another. All these signs really suggest that the country has gone off the rails. Meaning that seriously stupid thinking prevails across the country. You can see that in the universities and in the experts. Now we really have four signs of crisis:

  1. 9/11
  2. 2008 Financial Crisis
  3. Talk of great-power nuclear war
  4. Talk of civil war.

To Deal with the Russians, America Must Think Like the Russians | The National Interest

The risk of nuclear miscalculation is now higher than at any time since the Cuban Missile Crisis, due to increasingly lethal technology and the breakdown in almost all official mechanisms of bilateral communication since Russia’s annexation of Crimea. …”

This June, at the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum, Vladimir Putin angrily denounced the “hysteria” in Washington and in the U.S. media. Again, bitter accusations and scorn abound. Both U.S. and Russian experts now agree that once again there is a heightened risk of unintended nuclear war—much higher than in the early 1980s—but this danger is not as widely perceived as it was back then. There is less awareness, less alarm. Few people know as much about nuclear policy as William J. Perry, a former secretary of defense. He has been on a crusade this year, warning, “We are starting a new Cold War. We seem to be sleepwalking into this new nuclear arms race. . . . We and the Russians and others don’t understand what we are doing.”

To Deal with the Russians, America Must Think Like the Russians | The National Interest

One of the reasons that the risk is higher is that the people are different today from those during the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962. The people today have not directly experienced the horror of a major war. They don’t fear war like the people in 1962.

As Syria’s war enters its endgame, the risk of a US-Russia conflict escalates | The Guardian

Not for the first time there are dire warnings of a direct US-Russia confrontation in Syria that could escalate, in the worst case, into a third world war. What is going on has echoes of the proxy conflicts fought by the superpowers during the latter stages of the cold war, but with added elements of risk because the accepted rules and formal channels of communication to a large extent no longer exist.

The latest alarm sounded after US forces shot down a Syrian government warplane and Russia said it would in future treat any US plane flying west of the Euphrates as a potential target. Russia also announced that it was cutting the Russia-US hotline designed to prevent accidental clashes in the Syrian airspace. The US said it had acted in defence of opposition forces fighting Islamic State. Russia asked on what authority it was striking against the government of a foreign state

As Syria’s war enters its endgame, the risk of a US-Russia conflict escalates | The Guardian

America and the Geopolitics of Upheaval | The National Interest

During Donald Trump’s presidency and after, U.S. foreign policy is likely to be wracked by crises. The instability and violence along a resurgent Russia’s periphery, the growing frictions with an increasingly assertive China, the provocations of a rapidly nuclearizing North Korea and the profound chaos at work throughout the Middle East: these and other challenges have recently tested U.S. officials and are likely to do so for the foreseeable future. The world now seems less stable and more dangerous than at any time since the Cold War; the number and severity of global crises are increasing.

Yet crises do not occur in a vacuum; they are symptomatic of deeper changes in the international order. Accordingly, America’s responses will be ill-informed and astrategic unless Washington first forms a deeper conception of the current moment.

America and the Geopolitics of Upheaval | The National Interest

Syria: Downing of drones threatens to draw U.S., Iran further into war

“The underlying problem is Iranian expansionism,” said James Jeffrey, a former U.S. ambassador to Iraq with extensive experience in the region. The Iranians are worried about who will fill the power vacuum after the defeat of the Islamic State, which is steadily losing territory, he said.

Jeffrey said the administration is now grappling with developing a new strategy that takes into account efforts to blunt Iran’s actions to expand its influence at the same time the U.S. military is focused on defeating the Islamic State, also known as ISIS.

“They believe Iran must be contained, but what they haven’t worked out is the implications of that,” Jeffrey said.

Syria: Downing of drones threatens to draw U.S., Iran further into war

Bleeding America?

Could Woods and Savage, in particular, be right? The words, “Civil war,” are on more lips nowadays. Will America’s long cold civil war finally turn hot? And if war came, what sort of war would it be?

The very idea of civil war is horrific. Wars between nations are bloody and cruel enough. Wars within nations, among former kindreds, may not be bloodier but are often crueler. In some instances, it’s actually brother against brother.

For most Americans, their frame of reference is the U.S. Civil War. It was sectional rivalry — a “War Between the States.” It was generally — and neatly — defined geographically. History rarely repeats itself, so blue states lining up against red states — not for secession this go, but for national control – seems improbable.

Bleeding America?

The US and Russia may be getting closer to a military confrontation – Vox

Take the events of the past 72 hours alone. Yesterday over the Baltic Sea, a Russian fighter jet flying too fast and erratically came very close to a US plane, perhaps to within 5 feet.

This past Sunday, the US shot down a Syrian warplane, the first time America had done that during Syria’s civil war. That angered the Russians — allies of the Syrian government — to the point that its Ministry of Defense threatened to target US or allied aircraft flying over Syria west of the Euphrates River. The US ignored Moscow’s harsh words and shot down a Syrian drone Tuesday, something certain not to go unnoticed in the Kremlin.

Taken together, the incidents highlight the deteriorating relationship between the United States and Russia, the world’s top two nuclear powers. And it’s not looking like they’re going to become friends anytime soon, especially in Syria.

The US and Russia may be getting closer to a military confrontation – Vox

U.S.-China at Sea Incidents Are Likely the New Normal? | RealClearDefense

The US argues that these ISR missions are protected by the ‘freedom of navigation’. Even if this is so, these incidents are not about legal right and wrong. The two are engaged in a sparring match with feints, jabs and defensive moves as the two militaries and their intelligence communities size each other up by probing each other’s strengths and weaknesses. This sparring in itself is unlikely to trigger a real fight with military punches and counter punches. Nevertheless, it is preliminary to conflict and thus bodes ill for the relationship.

U.S.-China at Sea Incidents Are Likely the New Normal? | RealClearDefense

The stakes in Syria now include US-Russia war | New York Post

What’s wryly striking is that the Russians, who see themselves as master strategists, are blind to the way Iran has been manipulating them: Iran got us to fight ISIS and may get Putin to fight us. Guess who wins, either way?

This could spin out of control very, very fast. If it does, we have to win rapidly and decisively — and keep it within Syria.

What happens now? Our military is war-gaming contingencies to ensure that, should the Russians fire on us, we’ll be prepared. We cannot let the Russians dictate where we fly and who we can protect. We’ve gone out of our way to avoid confrontations with Putin’s war criminals, but there’s a limit. And we may be about to reach it.

The stakes in Syria now include US-Russia war | New York Post

Are China and the US destined for war?

By 431 BCE, under the leadership of Pericles, Athens had become a formidable maritime power whose empire extended across the eastern Mediterranean region. Its challenge to the supremacy of Sparta, the warrior nation of the Peloponnesian peninsula, was obvious. According to historian and general Thucydides:

Growth of the power of Athens, and the alarm which this inspired in Sparta, made [the Peloponnesian] war inevitable.

Graham Allison’s new book, Destined for War, suggests a modern parallel in a rising power (Athens/China) causing fear in an established power (Sparta/the US) in which the necessary trust in one another is lost, and war becomes inevitable.

Are China and the US destined for war?