Category Archives: U.S.

America Vulnerable to Defeat Due to Reckless Cuts in US Military Spending

Air supremacy in doubt; General unsure US can win a war; ‘In a year we will only be able to deploy two carrier groups worldwide, down from three currently, and five just a year ago’

General Ray Odierno, the Army’s Chief of Staff recently testified that not only have we moved away from the long-held strategic objective of being able to fight and win two wars simultaneously, he is not even sure—given our current manpower levels—that we could win one. And, he noted, he didn’t see peace breaking out around the world.

Reckless Cuts to US Military Spending Leaving America Vulnerable | New York Observer

Let me point out that America’s current vulnerability represents a window of opportunity that could start to end once Obama leaves office. Both Russia and China know about this window, and that a new president could close it. That means the current period is exceptionally dangerous. For sure Putin exploits events to his advantage. He is a reactionary, not big strategic thinker. If there is a credible event that Putin can use as an excuse to start a nuclear war with the US, then in my opinion he will.

What will happen to Putin on his current path if he does not start a war with the US?

Putin’s current path will probably lead to his downfall as Russia falls apart. Therefore, Putin must keep pushing outward into neighboring countries. At some point there must be a confrontation with the West which Putin can use as a pretext for nuclear war. In my opinion Putin and his inner circle have already decided about the possibility of nuclear war with the US. If the US interferes too much with Putin’s plans then there will be war.

Is it really credible to believe that Putin is serious about the possibility of nuclear war?

If you look back at Putin’s actions you will find that he is always escalatory. He doesn’t back down. He keeps going.

Russia Defiant After More Threats From West Over Ukraine – US News

Russian officials struck a defiant note Monday after Western leaders threatened to further punish Moscow for escalated fighting in eastern Ukraine over the weekend.

In televised comments after a meeting with students in St. Petersburg, President Vladimir Putin said that Ukraine’s army was at fault for the uptick in violence and accused it of using civilians as “cannon fodder” in the conflict.

“(Ukraine’s army) is not even an army, it’s a foreign legion, in this case a foreign NATO legion,” Putin said. “They have totally different goals, connected to the geopolitical containment of Russia, which absolutely do not coincide with the national interests of the Ukrainian people.”

That confrontational rhetoric came in the wake of Western threats that Russia would face further sanctions for its actions in east Ukraine, where 30 people were killed by rocket fire in the coastal city of Mariupol on Saturday. There was no fighting in Mariupol on Monday but Donetsk, the main rebel stronghold, was wracked by artillery explosions throughout the day.

Russia Defiant After More Threats From West Over Ukraine – US News

Our own state department has pointed out that Russia is effectively a mafia state. Russia is allies with rogue states Iran, Syria and North Korea. And it’s not a stretch to call Russia a modern-day Nazi state.

Analysts drew comparisons between Putin and Hitler following Putin’s speech announcing the annexation of Crimea | 1913 Intel – http://goo.gl/bzJAUh
Russian Professor Compares Russia’s Actions to Nazi Annexation of Austria – http://goo.gl/ppiQxJ
Russia Is Following in Nazi Germany’s Footsteps | Opinion | The Moscow Times – http://goo.gl/TU38G5
To Understand Putin, Read Orwell – POLITICO Magazine | 1913 Intel – http://goo.gl/cnp7Yi
Is Vladimir Putin a Psychopath? | 1913 Intel – http://goo.gl/AQbO9l
Russian Authoritarianism Degrading into Despotism, Pastukhov Says | 1913 Intel – http://goo.gl/V1aUaN

OK, but that doesn’t mean he is ready for nuclear war. Let’s take a look at some of the threats coming out of Russia over the last several years.

Russian Says Western Support for Arab Revolts Could Cause a ‘Big War’ – NYTimes.com
Ukraine crisis: Putin’s nuclear threats are a struggle for pride and status – Telegraph – http://goo.gl/6AvUBA
Russia Threatens Nuclear Strikes Over Crimea | The Diplomat – http://goo.gl/2mO3LP
Did Vladimir Putin Just Casually Threaten Nuclear War? | TheBlaze.com – http://goo.gl/WP5y75
Putin Warns Of Nuclear Power Consequences If Attempts To Blackmail Russia Don’t Stop | 1913 Intel – http://goo.gl/WEvlye

Why Putin’s Russia Is The Biggest Threat To America In 2015 – Forbes

Like the stock market crashes that periodically wipe out so many fortunes, military crises are hard to predict. … America’s policy elite never seems to see looming danger until it is too late.

So don’t be surprised if the economic sanctions Washington has led the West in imposing on Russia look like a bad idea a year from now. At the moment, a combination of sanctions and plummeting oil prices seems to be dealing the government of President Vladimir Putin a heavy blow — just retribution, many say, for its invasion of Ukraine and annexation of Crimea last year. But as Alan Cullison observed in the Wall Street Journal this week, sanctions sometimes provoke precisely the opposite response from what policymakers hope. In Russia’s case, that could mean a threat to America’s survival. Let’s briefly consider how Russia’s current circumstances could lead to dangers that dwarf the challenges posed by ISIS and cyber attacks.

A paranoid political culture. Russia’s moves on Ukraine look to many Westerners like a straightforward case of aggression. That is not the way they look to Vladimir Putin’s inner circle of advisors in Moscow, nor to most Russians. …

A nuclear arsenal on hair trigger. … A senior Russian officer has stated that 96% of the strategic rocket force can be launched within minutes.

A collapsing economy. Much of Putin’s popularity within Russia is traceable to the impressive recovery of the post-Soviet economy on his watch. … Many Westerns believe a prolonged recession would weaken Putin’s support, but because he can blame outsiders, economic troubles might actually strengthen his hand and accelerate the trend toward authoritarian rule.

A deep sense of grievance. Blaming outsiders for domestic troubles has a long pedigree in Russian political tradition, and it feeds into a deep-seated sense that Russia has been deprived of its rightful role in the world by the U.S. and other Western powers. …

The unspoken wisdom in Washington today is that if nobody gives voice to such fears, then they don’t need to be addressed. That’s how a peaceful world stumbled into the First World War a century ago — by not acknowledging the worst-case potential of a crisis in Eastern Europe — and the blindness of leaders back then explains most of what went wrong later in the 20th Century. …

Why Putin’s Russia Is The Biggest Threat To America In 2015 – Forbes

You can ignore all of this if you want to, but that might be a big mistake. Given that America is actually vulnerable to defeat right now means that one needs to be especially prepared. Did I mention that US nuclear forces are showing signs of age and personnel stress? Not to mention that it is mostly gone. Enough remains to retaliate one time then there is nothing. Is that a good idea?

Turner: Putin’s Actions Must ‘Come With a Price’

Rep. Mike Turner, R-Ohio, in a telephone interview Thursday evening with CongressWatch, wants Obama to “acknowledge that Russian troops” inside Ukraine “represent an invasion.”

A member of the House Armed Services and Intelligence committees, Turner says it’s time for Obama to respond to Russian President Vladimir Putin with “a military deterrent.”

Administration officials “can make it clear that Russia’s actions will come at a price,” he said. “I think it needs to be a military deterrent.

“Russia should see they don’t have unfettered military reach throughout Europe without there being a credible military response,” Turner said. “The fact that [Obama] has almost been so committed to a diplomatic and sanctions regime that he seems blind to the true military actions that are happening.”

Turner: Putin’s Actions Must ‘Come With a Price’

US to close 15 EU military bases despite Russia crisis

The US plans to close 15 Cold War-era military bases in Europe despite the Russia crisis, but net troop numbers will remain more or less the same.

The biggest shutdown is a US air base in Mildenhall, UK, which will see 2,000 military and civilian personnel go home.

But the move will be offset by an extra 1,200 personnel at the Lakenheath air base, which will host two new squadrons of F-35 fighter jets from 2020.

The UK will see US troops move from the Alconbury and Molesworth bases to a site in Croughton.

Germany is to lose seven bases – Mainz Kastel, Barton Barracks, Weilimdorf, Baumholder, Wiesbaden, Pirmasens, and Illesheim/Sembach. But other changes will see a net increase in 500 US troops.

US to close 15 EU military bases despite Russia crisis

US and Russia in danger of returning to era of nuclear rivalry | World news | The Guardian

American threats to retaliate for Russian development of new cruise missile take tensions to new level

A widening rift between Moscow and Washington over cruise missiles and increasingly daring patrols by nuclear-capable Russian submarines threatens to end an era of arms control and bring back a dangerous rivalry between the world’s two dominant nuclear arsenals.

Tensions have been taken to a new level by US threats to take retaliatory action for Russian development of a new cruise missile. Washington alleges it violates one of the key arms control treaties of the cold war, and has raised the prospect of redeploying its own cruise missiles in Europe after a 23-year absence.

On Boxing Day, in one of the more visible signs of the unease, the US military launched the first of two experimental “blimps” over Washington. The system, known as JLENS, is designed to detect incoming cruise missiles. The North American Aerospace Command (Norad) did not specify the nature of the threat, but the deployment comes nine months after the Norad commander, General Charles Jacoby, admitted the Pentagon faced “some significant challenges” in countering cruise missiles, referring in particular to the threat of Russian attack submarines.

US and Russia in danger of returning to era of nuclear rivalry | World news | The Guardian

A Vital Nuclear Agreement, at Risk – NYTimes.com

There’s much more to the deeply troubled Russian-American relationship than Ukraine. Under the radar, tensions have also been brewing over compliance with a number of arms control treaties that for decades have been vital to keeping the peace between the two nuclear powers and setting an example for other countries.

Washington accuses Moscow of violating at least five of these agreements. A failure to resolve the impasse could have extremely dangerous consequences for the post-Cold War order, since even 20 years after the fall of the Soviet Union, the two sides together possess more than 10,000 nuclear weapons, more than 90 percent of what exists in the world.

The most serious dispute centers on the 1987 Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces Treaty, which bans both sides from deploying ground-launched ballistic and cruise missiles with a range of between 300 and 3,400 miles that carry nuclear or conventional warheads. These were among the weapons America once stationed in Europe to demonstrate a commitment to its allies and deter the Soviets from aggression.

A Vital Nuclear Agreement, at Risk – NYTimes.com

Why Putin’s Russia Is The Biggest Threat To America In 2015

“… sanctions sometimes provoke precisely the opposite response from what policymakers hope. In Russia’s case, that could mean a threat to America’s survival. Let’s briefly consider how Russia’s current circumstances could lead to dangers that dwarf the challenges posed by ISIS and cyber attacks.”

So don’t be surprised if the economic sanctions Washington has led the West in imposing on Russia look like a bad idea a year from now. At the moment, a combination of sanctions and plummeting oil prices seems to be dealing the government of President Vladimir Putin a heavy blow — just retribution, many say, for its invasion of Ukraine and annexation of Crimea last year. But as Alan Cullison observed in the Wall Street Journal this week, sanctions sometimes provoke precisely the opposite response from what policymakers hope. In Russia’s case, that could mean a threat to America’s survival. Let’s briefly consider how Russia’s current circumstances could lead to dangers that dwarf the challenges posed by ISIS and cyber attacks.

A paranoid political culture. Russia’s moves on Ukraine look to many Westerners like a straightforward case of aggression. That is not the way they look to Vladimir Putin’s inner circle of advisors in Moscow, nor to most Russians. That inner circle is drawn mainly from the Russian security services — Putin himself spent 16 years in the KGB — and to them the revolution in Ukraine was a U.S.-backed coup aimed at weakening Russia. Putin describes the Crimea as a birthplace of Russian culture, and his government has repeatedly warned against the expansion of Western economic and political influence into a region historically regarded as Moscow’s sphere of influence. Putin relies heavily on the Kremlin bureaucracy to provide him with intelligence (he avoids the Internet), so his briefings tend to reinforce the view that Moscow was forced to intervene in Ukraine by Western subversion aimed at undermining his rule.

A nuclear arsenal on hair trigger.

A collapsing economy.

A deep sense of grievance.

A vulnerable antagonist.

Why Putin’s Russia Is The Biggest Threat To America In 2015

US and allies confrontation with Russia and China on scale never seen since Cold War

From the skies of the Baltic to the South China Sea, a new era of confrontation with Russia and China is pitting U.S. and allied pilots against their counterparts on a scale not seen since the Cold War era.

It is, current and former officials say, a major shift for air crews who by and large have spent more than a decade flying largely uncontested missions over Afghanistan and Iraq.

Lying behind the aerial sabre-rattling are high tensions between the West and Russia over Moscow’s perceived role in Ukraine’s separatist conflict.

And China, as it builds up its military on the back of economic growth, has become more assertive over multiple maritime boundary rows with neighbors, some of them allied by treaty with the United States.

US and allies confrontation with Russia and China on scale never seen since Cold War

The Best Years to Invade America Are 2015 and 2028 — War Is Boring — Medium

If you’re a major world power, a megalomaniacal trillionaire with a private navy or some seagoing alien race, the best years to invade the United States will be 2015 and 2028.

Because those are the years the U.S. Navy—the main protector of America’s sovereignty—will be weakest, according to the sailing branch’s latest fleet plan.

But before the fleet grows, it’s actually going to shrink by four vessels in 2015. That’s because next year, older warships will decommission faster than new ships float out of the country’s shipyards.

With 284 vessels, the Navy will be as small as it’s going to get for a good long time, assuming today’s plan holds.

But overall ship numbers are arguably less important than the precise mix of ships. So a smart invader might want to wait until 2028 to launch an attack on American shores, because 14 years from now is when the Navy’s attack submarine fleet will probably decline to a modern low.

The Best Years to Invade America Are 2015 and 2028 — War Is Boring — Medium

Air Force admits nuclear flaws, faces uncertain path to remedying underinvestment, low morale | Fox News

Faced with one of its biggest challenges in years — repairing a troubled nuclear missile corps — the Air Force has taken an important first step by admitting, after years of denial, that its problems run deep and wide.

Less certain is whether it will find all the right fixes, apply them fully and convince a doubting force of launch officers, security guards and other nuclear workers that their small and narrow career field is not a dead end.

The stakes are huge.

The nation’s strategy for deterring nuclear war rests in part on the 450 Minuteman 3 missiles that stand ready, 24/7, to launch at a moment’s notice from underground silos in five states.

Air Force admits nuclear flaws, faces uncertain path to remedying underinvestment, low morale | Fox News

Welcome to China and America’s Nuclear Nightmare | The National Interest

FOR ALL the focus on maritime disputes in the South and East China Seas, there is an even greater peril in Asia that deserves attention. It is the rising salience of nuclear weapons in the region. China’s military buildup—in particular its growing capabilities to blunt America’s ability to project effective force in the western Pacific—is threatening to change the military balance in the area. This will lead to a cascade of strategic shifts that will make nuclear weapons more central in both American and Chinese national-security plans, while increasing the danger that other regional states will seek nuclear arsenals of their own. Like it or not, nuclear weapons in Asia are back.

For seventy years, the United States has militarily dominated maritime Asia. During this era, U.S. forces could, generally speaking, defeat any challenger in the waters of the western Pacific or in the skies over them. Washington established this preeminence and has retained it in the service of a strategy motivated both by parochial interests such as protecting American territory and commerce as well as by more high-minded aspirations to foster the growth and development of prosperous, liberal societies within the region. Military primacy has been the crucial underwriter, the predicate of broader American strategy.

Welcome to China and America’s Nuclear Nightmare | The National Interest