Category Archives: Venezuela

Power Moves: How Venezuela’s Maduro Is Shoring Up His Defenses | Americas Quarterly

If the mood on the streets of Caracas is a guide, Venezuelans are increasingly reconciling themselves to an uncomfortable idea: President Nicolás Maduro isn’t going anywhere.

Despite Venezuela enduring one of the most profound economic and political crises of any Latin American country in recent memory – and amid yearlong calls for Maduro’s ouster in 2016 – the president’s grip on power appears unexpectedly secure. After two decades spent consolidating control over the country’s institutions, Chavismo will be harder to dislodge from power than many had hoped.

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Power Moves: How Venezuela’s Maduro Is Shoring Up His Defenses | Americas Quarterly

Venezuela survey: 75% of population lost 19 pounds amid food crisis – UPI.com

Venezuela’s Living Conditions Survey found that nearly 75 percent of the population lost an average of at least 19 pounds in 2016 due to a lack of proper nutrition amid an economic crisis.

Venezuelans are not consuming the 2,000 recommended daily calories needed, the survey said. Venezuela’s extreme poor said they have lost more than 20 pounds.

Venezuela survey: 75% of population lost 19 pounds amid food crisis – UPI.com

Congratulations To Bolivarian Socialism – Venezuela Sees The Old Child Killing Diseases Back

There were those of us who kept insisting that it wasn’t going to be amusing when those wheels did come of of course but we were, in general, shouted down by those who insisted that this Bolivarian socialism was something new, something wondrous. Look, look! Look how it reduced inequality, look how much better off the poor are! But as everyone who stayed awake in even their first economics class has always known those wheels would come off and it wouldn’t be pretty when they did. As has happened of course. And the latest evidence of this is that the old child killers are back. At present it’s diphtheria but it won’t be long before more of them start massacring the young. Measles, whooping cough cannot be far behind and it’s only because we’ve entirely wiped out smallpox that it won’t be making an appearance:

Congratulations To Bolivarian Socialism – Venezuela Sees The Old Child Killing Diseases Back

Rex Tillerson Already Talking Regime Change in Venezuela | News | teleSUR English

“If confirmed, I would urge close cooperation with our friends in the hemisphere, particularly Venezuela’s neighbors Brazil and Colombia, as well as multilateral bodies such as the OAS, to seek a negotiated transition to democratic rule in Venezuela,” the former executive in ExxonMobil told Latin America Goes Global.

He further claimed that the economic crisis in the oil-rich South American country was “largely a product of its incompetent and dysfunctional government, first under Hugo Chavez, and now under his designated successor, Nicolas Maduro.”

Rex Tillerson Already Talking Regime Change in Venezuela | News | teleSUR English

Something’s Got to Give in Venezuela | Geopolitical Futures

“We expect the breaking point to arrive this year, …”

There is no denying that Venezuela finds itself in the midst of an economic and political crisis. On Jan. 23, the South American country will make headlines with nationwide anti-government protests. Our 2017 forecast states that the government of President Nicolás Maduro in its current form will not survive because the status quo in the country is unsustainable. We expect the breaking point to arrive this year, but we do not believe the Jan. 23 protests will bring it about. However, the groundwork for its fruition is already being laid, and marking the baseline at the start of the year will be helpful for tracking its evolution.

Something’s Got to Give in Venezuela | Geopolitical Futures

Rex Tillerson got burned in Venezuela. Then he got revenge. – The Washington Post

Rex Tillerson hadn’t been CEO of ExxonMobil very long when the late president Hugo Chavez made foreign oil companies in Venezuela an offer they couldn’t refuse. Give the government a bigger cut, or else.

Most of the companies took the deal. Tillerson refused.

Chavez responded by nationalizing ExxonMobil’s considerable assets in the country, which the company valued at $10 billion. The losses were a big blow to Tillerson, who reportedly took the seizure as a personal affront.

Only Tillerson didn’t get mad, at least in public. He got even.

Rex Tillerson got burned in Venezuela. Then he got revenge. – The Washington Post

Socialist Military Selling Food at 100x Regulated Price to Starving Venezuelans

The military under the socialist regime of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro is capitalizing on the misery of the people they are sworn to protect by running illegal markets that sell food at 100 times the government-set price while much of the South American country finds itself on the verge of starvation, the Associated Press (AP) has learned.

“Lately, food is a better business than drugs,” retired Venezuelan Gen. Cliver Alcala told the AP. “The military is in charge of food management now, and they’re not going to just take that on without getting their cut.”

Socialist Military Selling Food at 100x Regulated Price to Starving Venezuelans

In Venezuela, lynchings kill one person every three days: report | Reuters

Roughly one person is being lynched in crisis-ridden Venezuela every three days as frustrated residents take revenge on suspected criminals, a monitoring group said on Wednesday.

The Venezuelan Observatory of Violence (OVV), which monitors crime, said mob killings have become a generalized phenomenon across the country, with 126 deaths reported in 2016 versus 20 last year.

“Due to being repeated victims of crime for more than a decade, and the feeling of not being protected, many people have decided to take justice into their own hands,” the OVV said in its latest annual report.

In Venezuela, lynchings kill one person every three days: report | Reuters

Some poor Venezuelan parents give away children amid deep crisis | Reuters

Struggling to feed herself and her seven children, Venezuelan mother Zulay Pulgar asked a neighbor in October to take over care of her six-year-old daughter, a victim of a pummeling economic crisis.

The family lives on Pulgar’s father’s pension, worth $6 a month at the black market rate, in a country where prices for many basic goods are surpassing those in the United States.

“It’s better that she has another family than go into prostitution, drugs or die of hunger,” the 43-year-old unemployed mother said, sitting outside her dilapidated home with her five-year-old son, father and unemployed husband.

Some poor Venezuelan parents give away children amid deep crisis | Reuters

Venezuela May Be Trump’s First Foreign Policy Flashpoint | Ramen IR

As a result, Venezuela’s collapse could have a notable impact on the US, albeit indirectly at first. While the two countries are separated by the Caribbean Sea, the problem remains that the Venezuelan crisis will largely affect countries in the Caribbean and Central America. Many of these countries receive large amounts of energy products from Venezuela at a discounted rate, with Caracas sending over US$50 billion in oil to these nations since 2005. Although the amounts have been decreasing, these energy subsidies make it easier for these local economies to operate. Venezuela’s implosion could lead to a cut in such provisions, causing economic upheaval in these already vulnerable countries, which could increase migration towards Mexico and the US, a dangerous path that many have already taken.

Venezuela May Be Trump’s First Foreign Policy Flashpoint | Ramen IR